perak1
Selamat datang Ke Perak1 forum** Kepada pelawat, sila mendaftar untuk menikmati segala kemudahan Perak1 forum.** Diharap semua sahabat yg baru berdaftar, sila memperkenalkan diri anda di ruangan forum .anda juga boleh login forums ini dengan email FB anda danjangan lupa Like Fb perak1:KENALKAN DIRI ANDA:. Perak1 forum.** Pelawat yang mengalami masalah register atau login sila emailkan kepada khalifah_alammaya2000@yahoo.com(forum admin support).** Selepas mendaftar, anda akan secara Automatik telah menjadi ahli perak1 forum dan seterusnya anda boleh login untuk memasuki Perak1 forum tanpa menunggu sebarang e-mail pengaktifan akaun.Selamat melayari Perak1 forum PASTI CERIA BERSAMA KAMI.
perak1


 
HomeCalendarGalleryFAQSearchMemberlistUsergroupsRegisterLog in

Receive all updates via Facebook. Just Click the Like Button Below

?

Dapatkan Widget Ini Di Aku Punyer Lah! | Get RM100 A Week @ Blogger Tips


Share | 
 

 Osteoporosis Bone Disease

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
kursus-latihan
Member
Member


Posts : 31
Join date : 2012-08-14

PostSubject: Osteoporosis Bone Disease   Wed Sep 17, 2014 12:19 pm

Osteoporosis Bone Disease


Osteoporosis ("porous bones", from Greek: οστούν/ostoun meaning "bone" and πόρος/poros meaning "pore") is a progressive bone disease that is characterized by a decrease in bone mass and density which can lead to an increased risk of fracture. In osteoporosis, the bone mineral density (BMD) is reduced, bone microarchitecture deteriorates, and the amount and variety of proteins in bone are altered. Osteoporosis is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a bone mineral density of 2.5 standard deviations or more below the mean peak bone mass (average of young, healthy adults) as measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; the term "established osteoporosis" includes the presence of a fragility fracture. The disease may be classified as primary type 1, primary type 2, or secondary. The form of osteoporosis most common in women after menopause is referred to as primary type 1 or postmenopausal osteoporosis. Primary type 2 osteoporosis or senile osteoporosis occurs after age 75 and is seen in both females and males at a ratio of 2:1. Secondary osteoporosis may arise at any age and affect men and women equally. This form results from chronic predisposing medical problems or disease, or prolonged use of medications such as glucocorticoids, when the disease is called steroid- or glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis.

The risk of osteoporosis fractures can be reduced with lifestyle changes and in those with previous osteoporosis related fractures, medications. Lifestyle change includes diet, exercise, and preventing falls. The utility of calcium and vitamin D is questionable in most. Bisphosphonates are useful in those with previous fractures from osteoporosis but are of minimal benefit in those who have osteoporosis but no previous fractures. Osteoporosis is a component of the frailty syndrome.

Signs and Symptoms of Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis itself has no symptoms; its main consequence is the increased risk of bone fractures. Osteoporotic fractures occur in situations where healthy people would not normally break a bone; they are therefore regarded as fragility fractures. Typical fragility fractures occur in the vertebral column, rib, hip and wrist.

Causes of Osteoporosis

Excess consumption of alcohol: Although small amounts of alcohol are probably beneficial (bone density increases with increasing alcohol intake), chronic heavy drinking (alcohol intake greater than three units/day) probably increases fracture risk despite any beneficial effects on bone density.

Vitamin D deficiency: Low circulating Vitamin D is common among the elderly worldwide. Mild vitamin D insufficiency is associated with increased parathyroid hormone (PTH) production. PTH increases bone resorption, leading to bone loss. A positive association exists between serum 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol levels and bone mineral density, while PTH is negatively associated with bone mineral density.

Tobacco smoking: Many studies have associated smoking with decreased bone health, but the mechanisms are unclear. Tobacco smoking has been proposed to inhibit the activity of osteoblasts, and is an independent risk factor for osteoporosis. Smoking also results in increased breakdown of exogenous estrogen, lower body weight and earlier menopause, all of which contribute to lower bone mineral density.

Malnutrition: Nutrition has an important and complex role in maintenance of good bone. Identified risk factors include low dietary calcium and/or phosphorus, magnesium, zinc, boron, iron, fluoride, copper, vitamins A, K, E and C (and D where skin exposure to sunlight provides an inadequate supply). Excess sodium is a risk factor. High blood acidity may be diet-related, and is a known antagonist of bone. Some have identified low protein intake as associated with lower peak bone mass during adolescence and lower bone mineral density in elderly populations. Conversely, some have identified low protein intake as a positive factor, protein is among the causes of dietary acidity. Imbalance of omega-6 to omega-3 polyunsaturated fats is yet another identified risk factor.

High dietary protein: Research has found an association between diets high in animal protein and increased urinary calcium, and have been linked to an increase in fractures. However, the relevance of this observation to bone density is unclear, since higher protein diets tend to increase absorption of calcium from the diet and are associated with higher bone density. Indeed, it has recently been argued that low protein diets cause poor bone health. No interventional trials have been performed on dietary protein in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

Underweight/inactive: Bone remodeling occurs in response to physical stress, so physical inactivity can lead to significant bone loss. Weight bearing exercise can increase peak bone mass achieved in adolescence, and a highly significant correlation between bone strength and muscle strength has been determined. The incidence of osteoporosis is lower in overweight people.

Endurance training: In female endurance athletes, large volumes of training can lead to decreased bone density and an increased risk of osteoporosis. This effect might be caused by intense training suppressing menstruation, producing amenorrhea, and it is part of the female athlete triad. However, for male athletes, the situation is less clear, and although some studies have reported low bone density in elite male endurance athletes, others have instead seen increased leg bone density.

Heavy metals: A strong association between cadmium and lead with bone disease has been established. Low-level exposure to cadmium is associated with an increased loss of bone mineral density readily in both genders, leading to pain and increased risk of fractures, especially in the elderly and in females. Higher cadmium exposure results in osteomalacia (softening of the bone).

Soft drinks: Some studies indicate soft drinks (many of which contain phosphoric acid) may increase risk of osteoporosis, at least in women. Others suggest soft drinks may displace calcium-containing drinks from the diet rather than directly causing osteoporosis.


Click Here For Vitamins Supplements
Back to top Go down
View user profile
 
Osteoporosis Bone Disease
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1
 Similar topics
-
» April is Parkinson's Disease Awareness Month
» School me on silver mica disease
» T-bone rib roast.
» T Bone steaks
» Japanese maple care and recovery......... covering my bases

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
perak1 :: .::JUALAN GARAJ::. :: Internet Biz-
Jump to:  
Top posters
peace™ (1529)
 
miss-lady (1280)
 
sriteddy™ (1157)
 
salju (1063)
 
lipanx_laut (970)
 
macan_sparrow (742)
 
kuyie (668)
 
raffey-sama (509)
 
arb_mtq (432)
 
luvfama (297)
 
LATEST MOVIE TODAY
.:Sila click pada gambar dibawah untuk download boxoffice movie perak1 semoga terhibur :.